Process

People Forward Design

The model is designed to be useful at any step of your development cycle. Whether you are beginning form scratch or already started, we can position ourselves

We're a design and engineering agency, so one of the benefits of working with Punch is entire product exposure from conceptualization to delivery to customers. We also handle post delivery support, including user acquisition and marketing, so you'll get exposure to the entire lifecycle of a product from concept to growth stages.

Conducting a User Experience Analysis

Ask these questions during a UX analysis to understand your product, customer, and key goals.

Who is your primary audience?

Why we ask this You should strive for one primary audience. The primary audience is the key demographic (defined later as a persona) that dirves your business’s primary mission, goal, or profits. You can make exceptions for two primary audiences and should be prepared for the necessary complexity arising from two primary audiences. The only cases where more than 1-2 primary audiences are acceptable are for large organizations that have diverse and seperated product offerings, for example, a large consumer multi-national like Unilever. Otherwise, pick one audience.

Who is your secondary audience?

Why we ask this Secondary audiences can sometimes be important to the running of your business or can represent future growth opportunities. Sometimes, your business may not have a secondary audience.

What are the companies you look up to or admire?

Why we ask this The businesses that you find alluring or successful can often tell a lot about what kind of business you would like to become. They can be related to what you do or just brands you admire. Don’t have any? Find people or works of cultural production (like food, art, or music) that you do admire.

Who are your competitors? If you don’t have any, what new problem or market are you addressing?

Why we ask this Competitors have create a baseline for what is expected out of your business and can often be importan vectors for usability research. If you are entering or creating a new market be prepared for more heavy user research at analysis at the outset, which pays dividends during product building.

What does a successful user do on your website?

Why we ask this This answer helps us define successful conversions. Your ideal user is what you try to build your product around so that people who come to use your service or buy your product can live the ideal case.

What are the success metrics you look for?

Why we ask this For some companies, this can be page views, purchased cogs, social shares, user credit card data, or any number of metrics. The important thing is that the metric has to be measurable, have an existing value we can measure against, and be able to be tracked during the term of Punch’s engagement with the client. Not every client has success metrics. If they don’t, you can simply ask them what is a successful project look like for them. For example, in a re-brand, a success metric may simply be a colorful logo that scales down on mobile screens. We can still be successful with this, but we wouldn’t measure colors used before and after the design.

  1. Why do we need to say that here?
  2. If you stopped reading here, what’s the message?
  3. How does this make you feel?
  4. How else can we say this?
  5. What’s memorable about this?
  6. Who needs to know that?
  7. Who needs to see that?
  8. What’s the payoff?
  9. What does someone know now that they didn’t know before?
  10. How does that work?
  11. Why is that worth a click?
  12. What’s the simpler version of this?
  13. Why that order?
  14. What does a more polished version of this look like?
  15. What’s missing?
  16. What’s the obvious next step?
  17. Does that make it clearer?
  18. Would it matter if someone missed that?
  19. Would this be better as a sentence or a picture?
  20. What matters here?
  21. Why is that there?
  22. What would happen if we got rid of that?
  23. How can we make this more obvious?
  24. If we got rid of this, does that still work?
  25. How does this change someone’s mind?
Abbreviated from Jason Fried, “Questions I Ask When Reviewing a Design,” Signal v. Noise, October 11, 2011, accessed April 26, 2016, https://signalvnoise.com/posts/3024-questions-i-ask-when-reviewing-a-design.

Type

Patron

Patron is the brand font used by Punch. It is meant for use in every channel including print and digital. Designed by Milieu Grotesque, Patron has a large x-heigh making it suitable for digital use, as well as quirky features such as unusual ligatures (Tw, and www, for example) that mesh well with Punch’s brand.

Thin

AaBbCc 123

Light

AaBbCc 123

Regular

AaBbCc 123

Medium

AaBbCc 123

Bold

AaBbCc 123

Black

AaBbCc 123

Type

Ligatures

Patron is the brand font used by Punch. It is meant for use in every channel including print and digital. Designed by Milieu Grotesque, Patron has a large x-heigh making it suitable for digital use, as well as quirky features such as unusual ligatures (Tw, and www, for example) that mesh well with Punch’s brand.

Thin

www

Tw

ffi

ff

Light

AaBbCc 123

Regular

AaBbCc 123

Medium

AaBbCc 123

Bold

AaBbCc 123

Black

www

Tw

ffi

ff

Tabular figures and slashed zero

Safari has poor to non-existent support for text manipulation using open type.

On: 1234567890

Off: 1234567890

Small Caps

Safari has poor to non-existent support for text manipulation using open type. Chrome interprests these values more literally. For example, using font-feature-settings, Chome correcly chooses the true small caps of the typeface. Using font-variant, however, Chrome just shrinks the capitals down. This is standard behavior. Firefox, has the best interpretation for it finds the correct small caps in either case.

Foxy Nymphs Drive Quick (feature settings)

Foxy Nymphs Drive Quick (font variant)